AOC is a brand primarily known for its gaming, mainstream, stylish, and entry-level displays. Meanwhile, the company also has its 90-series monitors aimed at demanding professionals, offering color accuracy and other features appreciated by the target audience. Last week the company introduced its most advanced addition to the 90-series lineup: the U2790PQU display that combines a 10-bit 4K panel and a relatively low price.

The AOC U2790PQU monitor is based on a 10-bit 27-inch IPS panel featuring a 3840×2160 resolution, 350 nits brightness, a 1000:1 contrast ratio, 5 ms response time, 60 Hz refresh rate, and 178/178º viewing angles. For some reason, AOC does not disclose anything about the color gamuts the display supports, but indicates that the LCD supports the company’s Wide Color Gamut technology, which might mean that we are dealing with a monitor that supports wider than 100% sRGB color gamut, but this is only a suggestion.

Two important features of the AOC U2790PQU display are their very thin bezels along with an adjustable stand. The former will enable owners to organize multi-monitor setups easier.

When it comes to connectivity, the AOC U2790PQU has one DisplayPort 1.2, an HDMI 2.0, and one HDMI 1.4 input. In addition, the monitor has integrated speakers, a headphone out, and a dual-port USB 3.0 hub.

Brief Specifications of the AOC's U2790PQU
Panel 27" IPS
Resolution 3840 × 2160
Refresh Rate 60 Hz
Response Time 5 ms gray-to-gray
Brightness Normal: 350 cd/m²
Contrast 1000:1
Viewing Angles 178°/178° horizontal/vertical
Color Saturation ?
Display Colors 1.07 billion
3D-LUT ? bits
Pixel Pitch 0.1554 mm²
Pixel Density 163 PPI
Anti-Glare Coating ?
Inputs 1 × DP 1.2
1 × HDMI 2.0
1 × HDMI 1.4
USB Hub dual-port USB 3.0 hub
Audio 2 × 2 W speakers
3.5-mm mini jack
Mechanical Design Chassis Colors: black, metallic.
Tilt: yes
Height Adjustment: yes
Swivel: yes
Power Consumption Idle 0.5 W
Active 35 W

AOC will start selling the monitor in July for £299 in the UK. Pricing in the US is unknown, yet it is likely that its MSRP will be around $315.

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Source: AOC

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  • imaheadcase - Tuesday, July 2, 2019 - link

    For coding you wouldn't care about 4k at all. Most people code with multimonitor setup anyway so text is easier to read. Reply
  • nicolaim - Tuesday, July 2, 2019 - link

    I disagree. I think two of these would be a great coding setup. 4K makes all text so much sharper, there's no going back once you make the switch. Reply
  • CU - Tuesday, July 2, 2019 - link

    I code with a 4K 32" monitor with no scaling. I use all the pixels with windows everywhere. I like it better than 2 smaller monitors. Reply
  • voicequal - Tuesday, July 2, 2019 - link

    "I code with a 4K 32" monitor with no scaling."

    Same here - 32" is really the bare minimum for 4K 100%. I was disappointed to find that 27" 4K with anti-glare was too hard to read at 100% scaling, and non-integer scaling is a blurry mess. That monitor is now relegated to 200% scaling, which gives less desktop real estate than my old 24" 1920x1200.
    Reply
  • Teckk - Wednesday, July 3, 2019 - link

    I have 27" 2K. Maybe have to see this personally once to notice the difference before thinking of buying Reply
  • Dark42 - Tuesday, July 2, 2019 - link

    Does it have freesync? Reply
  • timecop1818 - Tuesday, July 2, 2019 - link

    How can they call this shit professional if its only 350cdm?

    Also what happened to all the 24" 10bit 4K panels that dell & co used to use with GB/GB-R led backlight that produced proper whites without blue tint?

    Dell UP2414Q has garbage firmware that freezes/crashes on every wake up from standby, and NEC & Eizo etc clones are severely overpriced.

    WTB $400-500$ 4K 24" with 10bit IPS panel, 400-450+ cdm GB-R backlight, and proper displayport input (not MST crashy garbage like on Dell).
    Reply
  • lmcd - Tuesday, July 2, 2019 - link

    Windows 10's 1.5x scaling has been perfectly fine for me personally, which is all I need for my 24 inch 4K. It basically functions as a 1440p monitor, but with better video compatibility.

    Only app I've hated using with scaling is Oracle SQL Developer.
    Reply
  • hanselltc - Wednesday, July 3, 2019 - link

    When the specs are the real clickbait Reply
  • YouInspireMe - Wednesday, July 3, 2019 - link

    I got lucky and found a Seiki 39" 4K at Goodwill for $100. Been working fantastic as a monitor for the last year. I'm gonna cry when it breaks or wears out. Reply

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